Strong reduction in big steps

It has been a long while since I updated this blog, let me finally revive it with an easy but (hopefully) fun post, well ehm… at least some usable reference material!

Strong reduction is the ability for the interpreter of a functional language to reduce under function declaration. Usually, in OCaml for example, evaluation stops at the λ boundary; we might like to reduce under them for various reasons:

  • partial evaluation (e.g. λx. 2+2+x ⇒ λx. 4+x)
  • conversion checking in dependent type systems (is λx. (λy. y) x the same as λx. x?)

I never remember the big-step semantics of strong reduction, so I’m going to write them down here in glorious Unicode-art. Over the years I accumulated many small variants of reduction machines, both weak and strong, call-by-name or call-by-value… Here is a first shot, starting with the canonical, CBV weak head reduction and incrementally building up strong reduction; I’ll be probably extending this list when I remember other variants.

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